Research Labs

  • The Axel Lab is primarily concerned with olfaction, or the sense of smell.

  • The Califano Lab studies biology from the perspective of the complex networks of gene and protein interactions that define and regulate cell physiology.

  • The Fernandez Lab develops and applies Cryo-EM technology to the study of macromolecular complexes in eukaryotes.

  • The Fitzpatrick Lab uses cryo-EM to solve the structures of filaments isolated from postmortem brain tissue of patients with a range of neurological disorders.

  • The Frank Lab investigates the mechanism of translation on the ribosome by using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction.

  • The Goff laboratory is interested in the replication of the Moloney murine leukemia virus, an oncogenic retrovirus, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1, the cause of AIDS.

  • The Gottesman Laboratory investigates the mechanism of transcription termination in E. coli and how termination affects other cellular processes.

  • The Greene Lab uses single-molecule optical microscopy to study fundamental interactions between proteins and nucleic acids.

  • The Greenwald Lab studies cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, and cell fate specification during C. elegans development, with a focus on LIN-12/Notch.

  • The Hendrickson Lab focuses on the structure and function of biological molecules.

  • The Hobert Lab studies the gene regulatory control mechanisms that generate the astounding diversity of cell types in the nervous system.

  • The Honig Lab focuses on two distinct areas: the molecular basis of cell-cell recognition, and the use of structural information to predict protein function on a genome-wide scale.

  • The Kandel Lab studies explicit memory storage (the conscious recall of information about people, places, and objects) in mice and implicit memory storage in the snail Aplysia.

  • The Landweber Lab studies novel genetic systems in microbial eukaryotes, bringing a strongly mechanistic approach to understanding genome evolution and diversity.

  • The Lomvardas Lab aims to understand the molecular mechanisms of olfactory receptor gene choice.

  • The Maniatis lab is involved in understanding fundamental mechanisms of transcription and RNA splicing in the nervous system and how they bear on neuronal connectivity and neurodegenerative diseases.

  • The Mann Lab studies how the Hox family of transcription factors bind to the correct DNA sequences and regulate the correct target genes in vivo.

  • The Palmer Laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics uses NMR spectroscopy to study the structures and dynamical properties of proteins and other macromolecules.

  • The Shapiro Lab uses structural information obtained from X-ray crystallography to direct biochemical studies of biological problems.

  • The Sims Lab develops new tools for single cell and cell type-specific analysis, focusing mainly on transcriptional and translational regulation.

  • The Sobolevsky Lab studies ion channel signaling using cryo-electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, electrophysiology, and biophysical techniques.

  • The Sternberg Lab focuses on mechanisms of nucleic acid targeting by RNA-guided bacterial immune systems and on the development of these systems for genome engineering applications.

  • The Tavazoie Lab focuses on how cells adapt to changes in their external environment.

  • The Zhang Lab seeks to dissect RNA regulatory networks in the nervous system.

  • The Zucker Lab aims to elucidate mechanisms used for signal transduction and information processing in sensory systems.

  • The Jessell Lab studies systems and circuits that regulate movement - from the assembly of connections to neural strategies for motor action -the root of all behavior.